Town hall

Town hall

Printed on 230 g/m² paper

Matte finish

Printed in Malmö

Regular price
299 kr
Sale price
299 kr
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Frame and passe-partout is not included

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A town hall in Dutch Renaissance style.

In the 1530s, a new town hall was planned to be built on Stortorget. In 1546, the building, which was built of brick with bay windows and Gothic stair gables, was ready for use. The house housed, among other things, the grandiose Knutssalen. The best-preserved parts of the town hall is the cellar vaults, which today house a restaurant, Rådhuskällaren. The town hall has been the subject of several renovations since the 16th century.

During this time, Stortorget became one of the 16th century's largest squares in the Nordic countries. Malmö was also, at this time, one of the largest cities in the Nordic region, and therefore, they also began to build a new town hall along the eastern side of the square.

In the 1860s, the town hall was drastically redesigned according to plans by Helgo Zettervall. The façade was transformed into a Dutch Renaissance style. This work was complete in 1863

FAQ

Do you offer refunds?

Yes we offer refunds. You can read more on our Refund Policy

Can I pay with Klarna?

We offer Klarna straight from checkout. Just enter your contact information and shipping information and Klarna is at the last step.

Is there more houses and history coming?

The aim of this project is to have prints and history of all well known and less known houses of Malmö. You can follow our process and give feedback/ideas on our Instagram.

Do you offer custom prints of houses/more sizes?

Absoutely, if you have any specific requests please contact us either on Instagram or send us an e-mail at info@hom.design.

Our product

Our paper

Our paper used for the prints is FSC™ certified, meaning, it's more sustainable and better for the environment.

Package

We package each order with care. We use sustainable and renewable materials for each package we send out.
Why? We want to reduce our environmental footprint.